Biggest box-office bombs of all time

Stacker compiled a list of 50 of the biggest box-office bombs of all time using data from The Numbers.

Posted

Nicole Kidman in "The Invasion"

Warner Bros.

Making an expensive Hollywood movie is kind of like steering a gigantic cargo ship through a thunderstorm.

Onboard are hundreds of crew members, each performing a specific function. At the vessel's main helm are a handful of leaders, including the captain (the director), who may still be beholden to the powers that be. Tensions run high and opinions can clash over the best course of action. It can seem like a miracle when the vessel arrives at its destination intact.

Stacker is honoring the occasions when big-budget vehicles fail to deliver the goods by ranking the biggest box-office bombs of all time using data from The Numbers. Rankings were compiled based on worldwide box office earnings only and do not incorporate video or other retail sales. Only the first 1,000 movies with the highest reported budgets were considered for this story.

Sometimes it's easy to pinpoint where it all went wrong. Perhaps the storyline was difficult to follow or there were unexpected bumps that required a major change, such as bringing in a new director or having to recast the lead. Even a top-notch director and stellar cast aren't always enough to prevent disaster at the box office.

Keep reading to discover the biggest box-office bombs of all time and determine how many you've seen.

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#50. Around the World in 80 Days

Jackie Chan, Steve Coogan, and Cécile de France in "Around the World in 80 Days"

Walt Disney Pictures

- Estimated loss: $38 million
- Production budget: $110 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $72 million
- Release date: June 16, 2004

A remake of the 1956 film based on Jules Verne's classic novel, this action-adventure romp about an eccentric inventor who tries to travel the globe in 80 days stars Jackie Chan, Steve Coogan, and Cécile de France. It took plenty of liberties with its source material and deviated wildly from the plot of its predecessors, facts that likely led to it being a commercial failure.

#49. Titan A.E.

An animated still from "Titan A.E."

Fox Animation Studio

- Estimated loss: $38.2 million
- Production budget: $75 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $36.8 million
- Release date: June 16, 2000

Combining traditional animation with CGI, "Titan A.E." takes place in a distant future where Earth has been destroyed. A young man named Cale (voiced by Matt Damon) is threatened by killer aliens, so he must help locate an important spaceship, the Titan, before mankind perishes for good. The movie has a fairly strong fanbase to this day, but not enough to save it from tanking.

#48. Oliver Twist

Barney Clark in "Oliver Twist"

R.P. Productions

- Estimated loss: $38.3 million
- Production budget: $65 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $26.7 million
- Release date: Sept. 23, 2005

Roman Polanski directed this adaptation of the classic Charles Dickens story about a London orphan who joins a group of pickpockets to survive. Rotten Tomatoes perfectly summarizes why the movie was a commercial failure: Its visual style and character perspectives make it "a very impersonal experience."

#47. The Invasion

Nicole Kidman and Daniel Craig in The "Invasion"

Warner Bros.

- Estimated loss: $39.9 million
- Production budget: $80 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $40.1 million
- Release date: Aug. 17, 2007

"The Invasion," a sci-fi film about a psychiatrist who suspects an alien invasion is altering humans' emotional capacity, likely struggled to find an audience for two reasons. First, it was originally pitched and advertised as a remake of the 1956 hit "Invasion of the Body Snatchers," but the final product ended up being something else entirely: a fact that the average moviegoer likely wasn't aware of before buying their ticket. Second, the fact that the film had two directors and two writing teams inevitably led to an awkwardly disjointed final product.

#46. Son of the Mask

Bill Farmer, Liam Falconer, and Ryan Falconer in "Son of the Mask"

New Line Cinema

- Estimated loss: $40.1 million
- Production budget: $100 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $59.9 million
- Release date: Feb. 18, 2005

A stand-alone sequel to "The Mask," "Son of the Mask" follows Tim Avery (Jamie Kennedy) as he becomes a first-time father. This iteration had an entirely new cast, director, and writing team and, as a result, possessed none of the original film's magic. Audiences and critics were wildly disappointed with the finished product.

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#45. Meet Joe Black

Claire Forlani and Brad Pitt in "Meet Joe Black"

Universal Pictures

- Estimated loss: $40.3 million
- Production budget: $85 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $44.7 million
- Release date: Nov. 13, 1998

Director Martin Brest was coming off the success of "Scent of a Woman" when he helmed this 1998 melodrama, in which a personified Death walks among the living in the form of a man named Joe Black (Brad Pitt). With a rich media magnate (Anthony Hopkins) as his guide, Death learns about life and even falls in love with a woman.

A remake of 1934's "Death Takes a Holiday," the film used a large percentage of its budget to depict the extravagant lifestyle of its wealthy characters. If Brest thought things would pick up for him with his next project, he was dead wrong: His next project was "Gigli," which took the word "turkey" to another level.

#44. The Adventures of Rocky & Bullwinkle

Live actors in a scene with animated characters

CJ Entertainment

- Estimated loss: $40.9 million
- Production budget: $76 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $35.1 million
- Release date: June 30, 2000

Turning a beloved children's cartoon into a feature film might have seemed like a great idea to Hollywood executives, including Robert De Niro, who also starred, but this flop from 2000 proved to be an adaptation that few people were requesting. Like a low-budget follow-up to "Who Framed Roger Rabbit?," this embarrassingly bad film mixes animation and live-action for an effect that was campy at best.

#43. Flight of the Phoenix

Dennis Quaid in front of an airplane in a desert

20th Century Fox

- Estimated loss: $41 million
- Production budget: $75 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $34 million
- Release date: Dec. 17, 2004

After a plane crashes in the Mongolian desert, survivors work on building a new plane from the wreckage in the 2004 remake of "Flight of the Phoenix." Originally slated for release on a crowded Christmas lineup, the film was bumped up to Dec. 17—which did nothing to help its chances at the box office. Dennis Quaid, Tyrese Gibson, Giovanni Ribisi, and Hugh Laurie star.

#42. The Last Legion

Colin Firth and Aishwarya Rai Bachchan in "The Last Legion"

Dino De Laurentiis Company

- Estimated loss: $41.6 million
- Production budget: $67 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $25.4 million
- Release date: Aug. 17, 2007

Part historical drama, part fantasy epic, "The Last Legion" blends the true story of the fall of the Roman Empire with legends like that of King Arthur. Based on a novel of the same name by Valerio Massimo Manfredi, the film lacked the sparkling writing and well-thought-out pacing of its source material.

#41. Live by Night

Ben Affleck in "Live by Night"

Appian Way

- Estimated loss: $43.2 million
- Production budget: $65 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $21.8 million
- Release date: Dec. 25, 2016

Ben Affleck wrote, directed, produced, and starred in this historical crime drama about a Florida bootlegger-turned-mobster. It seems the studio knew the film might be a flop from the start, seeing as the release date was changed no fewer than six times. In the end, nearly everyone agreed that while pieces of the film were good, it just lacked that certain something that would take it from derivative to memorable.

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#40. 3000 Miles to Graceland

Christian Slater dressed as Elvis

Franchise Pictures

- Estimated loss: $43.3 million
- Production budget: $62 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $18.7 million
- Release date: Feb. 23, 2001

When it comes to this 2001 clunker, the shocking news isn't that it bombed—it's that it cost so much to make in the first place. "3000 Miles to Graceland" follows a group of criminals who rob a casino and then turn on one another during an Elvis impersonation week. Its cast includes Kurt Russell, Kevin Costner, Courteney Cox, and Christian Slater, among numerous others. As it turns out, more than $12 million of the movie's supposed budget went straight into an executive's pocket, prompting one of the financiers to sue.

#39. Rollerball

LL Cool J in a red helmet playing rollerball

Atlas Entertainment

- Estimated loss: $44.1 million
- Production budget: $70 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $25.9 million
- Release date: Feb. 8, 2002

1975's "Rollerball" is a dystopian film that takes swipes at an omnipresent corporate culture; its 2002 remake has the hallmarks of Hollywood money-grab. Drained of any social commentary, the plodding film takes place in the present day and centers on a violent, imaginary sport. And this time around, its critics were taking the harshest swipes.

#38. Virus

Jamie Lee Curtis and Billy Baldwin in a scene from "Virus"

Archive Photos // Getty Images

- Estimated loss: $44.4 million
- Production budget: $75 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $30.6 million
- Release date: Jan. 15, 1999

After boarding a Russian space vessel, members of an American crew come face to face with a deadly alien in this box-office fiasco from 1999. Most of the production budget presumably went toward special effects, and critics were accordingly impressed with the movie's visual aesthetic. There was just one problem: The filmmakers forgot to include an original or compelling story.

#37. Red Planet

A woman in a space suit floating in outer space

Warner Bros.

- Estimated loss: $46.5 million
- Production budget: $80 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $33.5 million
- Release date: Nov. 10, 2000

While a movie about terraforming Mars might seem prescient in retrospect, "Red Planet" is mostly just a failed sci-fi thriller. In the film, Robby Gallagher (Val Kilmer) partakes in the first manned expedition to Mars, where he and his fellow astronauts encounter a range of deadly obstacles. After tanking on the domestic and international front, the movie earned itself the nickname "Dead Planet."

#36. Hudson Hawk

Bruce Willis lying in a coffin

TriStar Pictures

- Estimated loss: $47.8 million
- Production budget: $65 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $17.2 million
- Release date: May 24, 1991

Every decade seems to have its signature flop; for the 1990s, it was "Hudson Hawk." In the film, a cat burglar is blackmailed into stealing a precious work of art while eluding the wrath of various cartoonlike characters. Bruce Willis didn't just play the lead role; he helped come up with the initial story.

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#35. Last Man Standing

Bruce Willis stands in a dusty street pointing a gun

New Line Cinema

- Estimated loss: $48.9 million
- Production budget: $67 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $18.1 million
- Release date: Sept. 20, 1996

Gritty director Walter Hill and occasionally gritty actor Bruce Willis teamed up for this remake of Akira Kurosawa's "Yojimbo," a movie that reportedly also inspired 1964's "A Fistful of Dollars." Willis plays a drifter who's caught in the middle of a war between Irish and Italian gangsters; violence and sarcastic remarks ensue. However, it wasn't enough to draw audience numbers—it tanked disastrously.

#34. Father's Day

Robin Williams and Billy Crystal in "Father

Warner Bros.

- Estimated loss: $49.3 million
- Production budget: $85 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $35.7 million
- Release date: May 9, 1997

Warner Bros. had high expectations for "Father's Day," seeing as it starred Robin Williams and Billy Crystal at the height of their respective careers with comedy veteran Ivan Reitman directing. However, Premiere magazine quoted a Warner Bros. insider saying, "When we saw the movie, it took the wind out of us." Meanwhile, this film was just one among many major disappointments for the studio that year.

#33. Legends of Oz: Dorothy's Return

Animated scene of a little girl and a giant bird surrounded by candy

Summertime Entertainment

- Estimated loss: $49.9 million
- Production budget: $70 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $20.1 million
- Release date: May 9, 2014

Based on the book "Dorothy of Oz" by L. Frank Baum's grandson, Roger Stanton Baum, this computer-animated children's movie follows our Kansas girl as she returns to the magical city to help save it from a villainous Jester. Despite having a star-studded cast including Lea Michele, Dan Aykroyd, Jim Belushi, Kelsey Grammer, Hugh Dancy, Oliver Platt, Patrick Stewart, and Martin Short, the film was a total flop thanks to its bland plot, cardboardlike characters, terrible animation, and bizarre original songs. The film lost so much money it caused the studio that produced it, Summertime Entertainment, to shut down completely.

#32. Hard Rain

Morgan Freeman and Christian Slater in "Hard Rain"

British Broadcast Corporation

- Estimated loss: $50.1 million
- Production budget: $70 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $19.9 million
- Release date: Jan. 16, 1998

This 1998 actioner ups the stakes by pitting an armored truck driver (Christian Slater) against a gang of thieves (led by Morgan Freeman) during a catastrophic rainstorm. A disaster film in every sense, "Hard Rain" was plagued by all sorts of problems during filming and in post-production. After a series of reshoots and delays, the movie came out around the same time Slater was dealing with a major scandal involving drug abuse and violent behavior. Between that and the negative reviews, it was dead on arrival.

#31. Battlefield Earth: A Saga of the Year 3000

John Travolta wearing lots of prosthetic makeup

Warner Bros.

- Estimated loss: $50.3 million
- Production budget: $80 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $29.7 million
- Release date: May 12, 2000

More than a mere box-office bomb, "Battlefield Earth: A Saga of the Year 3000" is one of the most ridiculed flops of all time. This big-budget sci-fi thriller—which depicts the future rebellion of mankind against alien overlords (aka Psychlos)—is penned by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard. Flaunting long dreadlocks and bad teeth, John Travolta plays a Psychlo named Terl. Travolta, a Scientologist, was a producer on the film as well.

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#30. Blackhat

Chris Hemsworth making a phone call

Legendary Entertainment

- Estimated loss: $50.3 million
- Production budget: $70 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $19.7 million
- Release date: Jan. 16, 2015

After making a string of notable films in the mid-to-late 1990s, director Michael Mann's output became uneven at best, culminating with this 2015 fiasco. The movie, bogged down by cheap-looking cinematography and a muddled storyline, sees Chris Hemsworth tackling a global ring of cyber terrorists. Most moviegoers didn't show up to see "Blackhat," and those who did were largely underwhelmed.

#29. R.I.P.D.

Jeff Bridges and Ryan Reynolds in "R.I.P.D."

Universal Pictures

- Estimated loss: $50.9 million
- Production budget: $130 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $79.1 million
- Release date: July 19, 2013

Jeff Bridges and Ryan Reynolds might sound like a match made in Hollywood heaven, but the two actors simply couldn't make 2013's "R.I.P.D." work. Based on a comic book, the film comes off as a poorly executed "Men in Black" imitation with the walking undead substituted for aliens.

#28. Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within

CGI characters sitting in a spaceship

Chris Lee Productions

- Estimated loss: $51.9 million
- Production budget: $137 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $85.1 million
- Release date: July 11, 2001

When making an expensive film based on a video game, it's probably wise to avoid discarding the elements that made the game such a big hit in the first place. But that's what this 2001 movie did, and the result was an epic financial disaster. Much of the film's budget went toward employing photorealistic computer animation, quite groundbreaking for its time and a primary selling point, but it fell flat with audiences and critics.

#27. Reminiscence

Hugh Jackman and Thandiwe Newton in "Reminiscence"

FilmNation Entertainment

- Estimated loss: $52.5 million
- Production budget: $68 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $15.4 million
- Release date: Aug. 18, 2021

"Reminiscence" isn't a bad film by any stretch of the imagination—it's just not quite as good as producers Lisa Joy and Jonathan Nolan's other project, "Westworld." Both media pieces feature similar themes and are neo-noir, science fiction stories, which obviously led audiences to compare the two. In the end, viewers felt "Westworld" was more original and unique than "Reminiscence." The favoritism showed in lackluster ticket sales.

#26. Timeline

A group of archeologists standing in a medical facility

Paramount Pictures

- Estimated loss: $53.3 million
- Production budget: $80 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $26.7 million
- Release date: Nov. 26, 2003

Adapted from the bestselling novel by Michael Crichton, this 2003 adventure flick follows a group of archaeologists who travel back in time to 14th-century France. The film might have cost $80 million to produce—$109 million when adjusted for inflation—but critics felt it looked downright cheap. That's without mentioning its muddled plot, poor writing, cheesy tone, and stiff acting. Audiences weren't too excited about it either.

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#25. Snake Eyes: G.I. Joe Origins

Andrew Koji and Henry Golding in "Snake Eyes"

Paramount Pictures

- Estimated loss: $53.3 million
- Production budget: $88 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $34.7 million
- Release date: July 21, 2021

Intended as a reboot of the G.I. Joe franchise, "Snake Eyes: G.I. Joe Origins" was not the fun, campy romp fans hoped it would be. Instead, the film was a dull, poorly shot feature whose only real purpose seemed to be setting the stage for future installments in the series. The only bright spot in the entire thing was Henry Golding's performance.

#24. Lucky Numbers

John Travolta smiles in the driver seat of a convertible

Paramount Pictures

- Estimated loss: $55 million
- Production budget: $65 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $10 million
- Release date: Oct. 27, 2000

"Lucky Numbers" proved anything but lucky once its numbers came in. Directed by Nora Ephron ("Sleepless in Seattle"), the comedy follows a down-and-out weatherman (John Travolta) as he engages in a lottery scheme. Why the movie cost so much to make is anyone's guess. It came out the same year as "Battlefield Earth," proving the year 2000 was simply not a good one for Travolta.

#23. Ballistic: Ecks vs. Sever

A man and woman struggle outside an industrial facility

Franchise Pictures

- Estimated loss: $55.7 million
- Production budget: $70 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $14.3 million
- Release date: Sept. 20, 2002

A skilled FBI agent (Antonio Banderas) must team up with his mortal enemy (Lucy Liu) to take down a common enemy in this 2002 clunker. More than just a huge box-office bomb, it holds the distinction of having a 0% Rotten Tomatoes score.

#22. The 355

Penélope Cruz, Diane Kruger, Jessica Chastain, and Lupita Nyong

Universal Pictures

- Estimated loss: $56.1 million
- Production budget: $75 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $18.9 million
- Release date: Jan. 6, 2022

A group of female spies from organizations worldwide must work together to prevent WWIII in this action flick. Jessica Chastain, Penelope Cruz, Fan Bingbing, Diane Kruger, and Lupita Nyong'o starred in this film written and directed by Simon Kinberg. It seems the film's online marketing was to blame for its box office failure, as it led many fans to believe the movie would be more clichéd and unimaginative than it actually is.

#21. Osmosis Jones

Two animated characters in a surreal landscape

Warner Bros.

- Estimated loss: $56.4 million
- Production budget: $70 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $13.6 million
- Release date: Aug. 10, 2001

Decades before Pixar's "Inside Out" took viewers inside the human brain, this 2001 animated flick explored the wonders of the human body—a zookeeper named Frank DeTorre's body, to be exact.

By swallowing a contaminated egg, Frank (Bill Murray) unleashes a deadly virus that could potentially destroy him from the inside out. It's up to a white blood cell named Osmosis Jones to save the day—with help from a cold pill, of course. Directed by gross-out kings the Farrelly brothers and featuring voices from various comedic talent, the movie kept things strictly PG, appealing to essentially no one as a result.

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#20. Playmobil: The Movie

Anya Taylor-Joy

DMG Entertainment

- Estimated loss: $58.7 million
- Production budget: $75 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $16.3 million
- Release date: Aug. 7, 2019

Set in the world of Playmobil toys (which, for the uninitiated, are adjacent to Legos) this animated children's movie follows a young girl as she attempts to save her brother after he's literally sucked into this make-believe universe. Like many other movies on this list, it had quite the star-studded cast—including Anna Taylor-Joy, Jim Gaffigan, Adam Lambert, Kenan Thompson, Meghan Trainor, and Daniel Radcliffe—but their star power wasn't enough to save it from being a commercial failure. Most viewers felt the film was just a glorified advertisement and that both the plot and original musical numbers came second to selling more toys.

#19. The Postman

Kevin Costner in a scene from "The Postman"

Warner Bros.

- Estimated loss: $59.2 million
- Production budget: $80 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $20.8 million
- Release date: Dec. 25, 1997

One might hear the words "Kevin Costner flop" and think of movies like "Waterworld," but "The Postman" remains his biggest box-office bomb. Costner directed and starred in the film, which takes place in post-apocalyptic America and follows a self-made postman as he delivers mail. If you're not intrigued, neither were movie crowds—it failed abysmally.

#18. Soldier

Kurt Russell and other cast members from "Soldier"

Warner Bros.

- Estimated loss: $60.4 million
- Production budget: $75 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $14.6 million
- Release date: Oct. 23, 1998

Another dud from Paul W.S. Anderson, this 1998 movie takes place in a future society where soldiers are trained from birth. One of those soldiers is Todd 3465 (Kurt Russell), who's left for dead on a distant planet and is eventually tasked with fighting off a new breed of trained killers. The film mostly comes across as a knock-off "Universal Soldier."

#17. Stealth

Jamie Foxx and Jessica Biel wearing fighter pilot gear

Columbia Pictures Corporation

- Estimated loss: $61.6 million
- Production budget: $138 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $76.4 million
- Release date: July 29, 2005

An action-movie veteran with four decades of experience under his belt, director Rob Cohen has run the full gamut in terms of quality, though most of his films are considered pretty bad. Meanwhile, this 2005 atrocity remains his biggest bomb to date. In the movie, starring Jessica Biel and Jamie Foxx, three pilots struggle to contain an artificial intelligence program before it kicks off a world war.

#16. The 13th Warrior

A woman tends to a wounded Antonio Banderas

Touchstone Pictures

- Estimated loss: $63.3 million
- Production budget: $125 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $61.7 million
- Release date: Aug. 27, 1999

Originally named "Eaters of the Dead," the title of the Michael Crichton novel upon which it was based, this John McTiernan film underwent drastic re-edits and a name change before arriving in theaters. Such significant restructuring only added to the movie's already bloated production costs and subsequent losses. In the film, Antonio Banderas plays a prophesied warrior who helps a clan of Vikings fend off an enemy threat.

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#15. Monster Trucks

A young man and woman sneak alongside a truck

Nickelodeon Movies

- Estimated loss: $63.4 million
- Production budget: $125 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $61.6 million
- Release date: Dec. 29, 2016

Representing Paramount Animation's first live-action film and 2017's first major flop, "Monster Trucks" chronicles the adventures of a young boy and his oil-eating creature friend. Long before the movie was released, early reactions to the trailer ranged from muted to scathing—the outlook was so grim that Paramount's parent company, Viacom, declared the film as a write-down before it even premiered.

#14. Onward

Tom Holland

Walt Disney Pictures

- Estimated loss: $66.6 million
- Production budget: $200 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $133.4 million
- Release date: Feb. 28, 2020

Disney-Pixar's "Onward," about two elf brothers who set out to find a magical artifact that will bring their deceased father back to life for 24 hours, was one of the first film victims of the COVID-19 pandemic. Released just a week before most theaters around the country shut down to help stem the spread of the virus, the movie was simply unable to sell tickets and recoup production costs. Still, it managed to be a critical and audience favorite once it hit streaming services, earning nominations for Best Animated Feature Film at the Golden Globes and Academy Awards.

#13. The Alamo

A group of men carrying rifles in the Old West

Touchstone Pictures

- Estimated loss: $68.1 million
- Production budget: $92 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $23.9 million
- Release date: April 9, 2004

What began as a project intended for Ron Howard ended up in the hands of John Lee Hancock, and things only got worse from there. True to its name, the movie depicts the famous 1836 showdown, where Davy Crockett (Billy Bob Thornton) and James Bowie (Jason Patric) helped a relatively small group of Texans and Tejano men fend off a Mexican army of more than 2,000 soldiers. The battle might have been victorious, but the film was an outright failure for Disney.

#12. The Nutcracker in 3D

A toy soldier and a young girl look into the distance

HCC Media Group

- Estimated loss: $69.5 million
- Production budget: $90 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $20.5 million
- Release date: Nov. 24, 2010

Financed primarily by Russian bankers, though filmed in English, this 2010 film barely penetrated the U.S. market and earned just $13.9 million in Russia. Consequently, the investors reportedly lost up to 90% of their backing. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's masterful ballet will live on, but this poorly received adaptation has already been forgotten.

#11. Monkeybone

Brendan Fraser in a scene from "Monkeybone"

Twentieth Century Fox

- Estimated loss: $69.6 million
- Production budget: $75 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $5.4 million
- Release date: Feb. 23, 2001

According to actress Rose McGowan, "Monkeybone" could have been an incredible movie had Fox Studios not fired its original director, Henry Selick. Instead, the film—about a cartoonist (Brendan Fraser) who gets trapped in a world of his own creation—remains one of the biggest flops of all time.

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#10. The Last Duel

Jodie Comer in a scene from "The Last Duel"

20th Century Studios

- Estimated loss: $69.9 million
- Production budget: $100 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $30.1 million
- Release date: Oct. 13, 2021

If you ask director Ridley Scott why he thought this Ben Affleck-Matt Damon-written film was a box-office failure, he'd tell you it was all millennials' fault. In an interview, Scott said millennials simply weren't interested in anything beyond their cellphones, and that's why no one bought tickets to the film. No word on whether he thought its subject (the true story of the last trial by combat in medieval France) or the film's slow pacing may have had anything to do with it losing nearly $70 million.

#9. How Do You Know?

Reese Witherspoon and Owen Wilson stand inside an elevator

Columbia Pictures Corporation

- Estimated loss: $70.4 million
- Production budget: $120 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $49.6 million
- Release date: Dec. 17, 2010

As the man behind shows like "The Simpsons" and movies like "Broadcast News," James L. Brooks is responsible for some of Hollywood's finest offerings. This 2010 dramedy is not one of them. Starring Reese Witherspoon, Owen Wilson, Jack Nicholson, and Paul Rudd, the movie finds its protagonist (Witherspoon) in the middle of a light-hearted love triangle. Apparently, Brooks decided to reshoot the beginning and end after completing the film, thereby inflating its already outrageous budget. Meanwhile, the lead actors earned a combined payday of $50 million, which didn't help the bottom line either.

#8. Chaos Walking

Tom Holland and Daisy Ridley in "Chaos Walking"

3 Arts Entertainment

- Estimated loss: $72.9 million
- Production budget: $100 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $27.1 million
- Release date: Feb. 3, 2021

Set on a planet where everyone can hear each other's thoughts and women have ceased to exist, "Chaos Walking" follows a man (Tom Holland) as he seeks to protect a girl (Daisy Ridley) who has crashlanded in his backyard. The film was critiqued by early viewers for its disjointed storylines, uneven pacing, and underdeveloped characters. Combined with the amount of negative critical reception it received, the film was certain to become a box-office failure.

#7. Cutthroat Island

Geena Davis holds a rifle aboard a pirate ship

Carolco Pictures

- Estimated loss: $73.5 million
- Production budget: $92 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $18.5 million
- Release date: Dec. 22, 1995

Geena Davis and Matthew Modine are a pair of pirates in this legendary turkey from Davis' then-husband, Renny Harlin. In later interviews, Harlin blamed part of the film's failure on production company Carolco, which was going under at the time. Another element in the film's demise? Harlin's own hubris in the wake of successful efforts like "Die Hard 2" and "Cliffhanger." A handful of poor casting choices didn't help either. Consequently, "Cutthroat Island" went down like a hole-ridden ship.

#6. A Sound of Thunder

Edward Burns in a scene from "A Sound of Thunder"

Franchise Pictures

- Estimated loss: $73.7 million
- Production budget: $80 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $6.3 million
- Release date: Sept. 2, 2005

Adapting a classic short story by Ray Bradbury, this 2005 sci-fi film explores the unintended effects of time travel. The movie features a scientist who travels back in time to the dinosaur era, strays off the designated path, and changes history in catastrophic ways. "The Simpsons" tackled the very same premise in a "Treehouse of Horror" segment.

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#5. The Promise

A scene from "The Promise" set in Turkey

Survival Pictures

- Estimated loss: $79.4 million
- Production budget: $90 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $10.6 million
- Release date: April 21, 2017

Billionaire Kirk Kerkorian was eager to see a big-budget movie about the Armenian genocide of 1915, so he paid for most of it himself. The result was this 2017 historical drama that floundered at the box office. That's in part due to some aggressive opposition from the Turkish government, though lukewarm critical reception certainly didn't help. Adding to its tragedy, Kerkorian passed away before production began.

#4. Moonfall

Halle Berry, Patrick Wilson, and John Bradley in "Moonfall"

Centropolis Entertainment

- Estimated loss: $90.9 million
- Production budget: $150 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $59.1 million
- Release date: Feb. 3, 2022

One of the most expensive independent films ever made, "Moonfall" is about a group of former astronauts and conspiracy theorists who discover the truth about the moon after it suddenly leaves Earth's orbit. Anxieties about a possible COVID-19-induced shutdown (which affected how many theaters the movie was sent to) and mixed critical reviews led this project to be a commercial failure.

#3. The Adventures of Pluto Nash

Peter Boyle and Eddie Murphy in a scene from "The Adventures of Pluto Nash"

Castle Rock Entertainment

- Estimated loss: $92.9 million
- Production budget: $100 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $7.1 million
- Release date: Aug. 16, 2002

After spending nearly two decades in development, "The Adventures of Pluto Nash" finally arrived in theaters in 2002 and swiftly became one of the most infamous duds of the modern era. Starring Eddie Murphy as a lunar nightclub owner in the year 2087, the film went big on camp and short on laughs—a significant drop in quality compared to the actor's better films. Murphy later said in an interview: "I know two or three people that liked this movie."

#2. Town & Country

Diane Keaton and Warren Beatty in a scene from "Town & Country"

New Line Cinema

- Estimated loss: $94.6 million
- Production budget: $105 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $10.4 million
- Release date: April 27, 2001

In a textbook case of movie-making gone awry, this disaster reportedly started with a production budget of around $14 million, which climbed to $40 million after several big names—namely Diane Keaton, Garry Shandling, Goldie Hawn, and Warren Beatty—joined the cast. The costs only escalated from there, and that was before the extensive reshoots in the wake of negative test screenings. Ultimately, it took three years for the movie—about the farcical exploits of an architect (Beatty)—to arrive on the big screen, where it went down in flames.

#1. Mars Needs Moms

CGI characters in a scene from "Mars Needs Moms."

Walt Disney Pictures

- Estimated loss: $110.5 million
- Production budget: $150 million
- Worldwide box office gross: $39.5 million
- Release date: March 11, 2011

This already forgotten Disney film, which cost more than $150 million to make, earned just over $6 million on its opening weekend. Produced by Robert Zemeckis, the film employs motion-capture animation, giving it an off-putting aesthetic. Whatever the reason, the stink on this one was so powerful that Disney removed the word "Mars" from an upcoming film title just to avoid conjuring associations. That film was "John Carter," which tanked anyway.

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